Not accepting books for review

Due to a health issue, I am currently NOT accepting books for review. I have every intention of completing the books that I have already accepted. The timeframes given remain the same, for now. I will contact you if I need more time.

This decision is not permanent. I need time to adjust to my medication and cannot allow myself to feel pressured. As soon as I am able to, I will return to accepting books for review, because I love books and I love reading. More importantly, I want to help new writers as much as I can.

ET is back

Taking a look in the archives I found two posts that relate to ET — Essential Thrombocytosis. The first was entitled The Disorder Has a Name, written in 2010 when I discovered the name of my health issue. The second was entitled A Stroke in Life, written in 2012 after I had a minor stroke.

Reading them now I can see the errors in my words, but eight to ten years has passes, and I’ve learned more over the years.

My body makes platelets, too many platelets, and this causes a problem. It means that I am susceptible to having a stroke. We know that it’s true and I’ve already had a minor stroke. What I didn’t realise way back then, was that the six weeks of feeling incredible sick turned out to be eight months. I lost half my hair during that time. I lost a lot of weight. And I lost eight months of social interaction with family and friends, because I was too sick to go anywhere or do anything.

But that terrible time came to an end. I remained on the injections for a further two years, but life kick started again and things returned to a new normal that included injections twice a week.

Other stuff happened, the passing of my dad, mum being diagnosed with Alzheimer’s Disease, loss of a house to flooding, to name a few. It was a trumatic time.

Then, my specialist announced that I had to stop the injections or I might end up with a different medical problem. I remember feeling nervous about stopping the injections. Fancy that. But I gathered that should I stop the injection and the disorder return, then I would have to start at square one all over again. That thought terrified me.

Guess what? I’m standing on square one and I had my first injection on Friday (after almost five years without them).

But it has been almost five years, so improvements have been made to the medication. I haven’t been as bad this first time, but I’m only on a third of the normal injection at present. But I feel hopeful that my immediate future will not be a replay of 2012.

eBook review: Ethaze & the Shadow Court

Ethaze & the Shadow Court by J.P. Kaeden

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

The blurb: Eleven-year-old Ethaze always believed her mother had died when she was little and that her father had abandoned her. When her Grandfather passes away, she learns her mother had been traded to the Fae. Leaving her village to rescue her mother, Ethaze discovers the existence of an uneasy truce between men, Fae and the Gods over the planes of existence.

The Order of Gafannon, a sect of blacksmiths trained in the old ways, are mankind’s protection against the Fae, providing the iron which disrupts their powers and binds them as mortals. Ethaze is drawn into the Void, the space between realities, where she encounters the imprisoned rogue Fae of the Shadow Court, those who have rejected the truce and have sought to establish their own power. Ethaze’s quest for her mother is part of something larger than she could have ever imagined.

My review: Presently, I seem to be reading books that are difficult to fit wholly within a defined age group. The main character in Ethaze and the Shadow Court is eleven, which should make this book for middle grade or younger readers. But I don’t agree with that. Ethaze is eleven, yet she comes across as around 16 to me. In my opinion, the book is for young adults.

However, the genre is simple to determine. Set in another world. Portals. The Fae. Yes, it’s a fantasy story.

The storyline grabbed me from the beginning. I liked Ethaze’s determination and wanted her to succeed in her quest from the start. Yet our path is never straight forward and we often get waylaid in real life, so it’s not surprising that poor Ethaze ran into all sorts of trouble on her journey. Her good nature and ethics see her wanting to help people, but it’s sometimes hard to know when and where to place trust. We also need to accept help from others, because sometimes we cannot reach our goal alone, but that too has its drawbacks.

I liked the relationships Ethaze created with the other characters, good and bad. They were convincing. Also, I enjoyed the way the author shared crafting techniques in a way that felt natural to the storyline. I don’t know if the blacksmith details are true or not, but I believed every word and that’s the important thing.

Allowing the reader to use their imagination when reading a book is important, in my opinion, and the author gave descriptions that didn’t drone on and bore me but allowed me to envision Ethaze’s world. I appreciated that.

The only negative thing for me to say is that the book has a lot of grammar errors that need addressing. Little things that are confusing, and other errors that are quite distracting, spoiling the reading experience. A good edit will improve the story tenfold. But if you can ignore these imperfections, you’ll find a good story worth reading.

Despite the errors, I thoroughly enjoyed the book and would happily read book 2 when it’s released.

Recommended.

I received a review copy of this book, and this is an honest review.