December Goals

Christmas is fast approaching, and lately I’ve been busy doing other things and haven’t done anything writing related. The feelings of guilt have been simmering and now I think I need to make a public goal in order to force myself into action.

In the next three weeks, up to but not including the Christmas weekend, I want to get the following two goals completed:

1) Read through the final edit from the editor of the anthology project and make the necessary changes. Once complete, send it back to him.

2) Write the first draft of a short story. This story must be between 3000 and 5000 words and I fear the story I plan to write is too ambitious. I rejected this story for the anthology earlier in the year because I didn’t think I could write it under 8,000 words and here I am going to attempt writing it under 5,000 words. The difference is that I know exactly who the target audience is and can make some necessary adaptions because of that, which will save me some explaining. Besides, if I don’t go with this storyline, I have nothing else simmering, so I must attempt it.

Persistence

You must keep sending work out; you must never let a manuscript do nothing but eat its head off in a drawer. You send that work out again and again, while you’re working on another one. If you have talent, you will receive some measure of success – but only if you persist.
~Isaac Asimov – US science fiction novelist & scholar (1920 – 1992)

ClichéCleaner

This has been recommended to me by a couple of people now, so I think it’s only fitting that I share a link with you.

To quote what they say on the web page:

ClichéCleaner is a program that helps you write better, by highlighting passages in your text that are either clichés, other overly-used common expressions, or phrases of your own that you have repeatedly used within the same document. ClichéCleaner includes a list of nearly 7000 unique clichés and common expressions that are compared against your text.”

Another Green Light

This time the green light that has been given is good. Today, I’ve been given the green light by a young reader who was kind enough to read the first chapter of Cat’s Eyes.

The young lady is almost 12 and is an avid reader. She’s the daughter of a writer and I was warned beforehand that she’s VERY fussy. I was nervous, because it’s important to me that young readers connect to the characters straight away and this is the first step in finding out.

She has asked for the rest of the manuscript. That made me feel really good, even though I’m actually feeling unwell today. Let’s hope the rest of the manuscript lives up to her expectations.

Green Light

On the news this morning, they said that the green light was given for the “amended” work reforms. In other words, Howard intends to start turning this into a capitalist country. He’s already pushing for privatisation, now he’s pushing for lower wages (for the lower class, of course; the rich will be unaffected, as usual) and next, he’ll announce that he’s making changes to the health system.

This afternoon, I hear he’s going to start looking at the welfare system. Heaven forbid, if Howard had to survive on what unemployed and disabled people are getting now (which would be loose change to him) he’d realise that the basic amount isn’t enough to cover the cost of rent these days.

As for making disability pensioners return to work…tell me, if that person should be a heart patient (for instance) and they die due to the stress of working (which is what gave them heart disease to start with), is the Government going to compensate the family? Those people have already had a warning, they’ve already had by-passes, they’ve already been given a chance at life. How does Howard know that they’d get another chance? How does he know that the next time won’t result in death? Maybe that’s what he wants. People are given the pension for a reason, I can’t remember hearing that Howard had returned to university to gain qualifications as a doctor.

Before we know it, the way of life we enjoy now will be gone. The people need to give the man the sake.